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MattyB

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Everything posted by MattyB

  1. Even though I agree with him that mobiles are potentially capable of causing the kind of transmission (note - not reception!) issues that David Blandford talks about in the BMFA News, personally I thought it was a poorly written and badly argued article... There was more than a whiff of "look at my medals, I may have no proof but you should believe what I say because of my professional experience and the people I know/have talked to". The tone was derogatory at times, dismissing anyone with doubts as a "...flat earther". If he is trying to convince people he's going about it a very strange way. Quite a few completely unsubstantiated views were presented as "facts" - case in point, "...cheaper gear will necessarily be more prone to EMP than top-end stuff, all other factors being equal, since cheaper gear will have little or no screening"! Err, what actual evidence do you actually have of that mate? He then goes on to give an example in the next column of an example of what he believes to be mobile induced incident where his own JR 2.4 GHz radio was affected - presumably he believe are JR a "cheap, poorly shielded" brand then? If not, why did it have an issue? As is pointed out in this thread, he completely overlooks the fact that many modern TXs have built in wireless update/config capabilities, and are designed to be used with a phone in direct connection via bluetooth or wifi. Are these also "poorly shielded"? What about the fact large numbers of TXs have wireless trainer facility using an inbuilt 2.4GHz RX and/or bluetooth whilst they are controlling the model? Here's another chestnut from the article.... "Keep your phoone away from all your radio gear at all times, not just when flying. If you put your transmitter down in your car next to your phone while you have a coffee you may still get data corruption" - has he validated that view with the engineers at Spektrum, Frsky and Jeti then? ? If I am standing next to someone else flying with another TX that transmitter could be only a few inches from mine - why does he not talk about this use case? Presumably he believe the lower power of our TXs vs mobile phones is part of that, but again, it's a significant use case he fails to discuss, presumably because it may undermine his argument. Most tellingly for me, our esteemed author completely overlooks the fact it is perfectly possible to do some controlled scientific testing using modern telemetry RC gear. Example - Setup a model to carry two receivers with independent power supplies. One is for control and is connected to the servos and bound to the primary TX. The second (which must have telemetry logging capability) is connected to nothing other than the secondary power supply onboard, but bound to a second TX with a phone directly strapped to the back of it. For the experiment the model takes off and is flown around by a pilot on the primary TX, whilst a number of tests can be made with the phone (call it, browse internet, connect to wifi, use as wifi hotspot etc) by other people. After the flight the secondary TX setup, phone and telemetry logs can then be checked to see if anything happened, at what point and map it to specific activities undertaken on the phone. Within a few flights you should be able to get some pretty decent data - no, not thousands of data points, but a heck of a lot more than what he has today (which is entirely qualitative). One can only wonder why if he is so interested in this topic he has not tried to do some real testing of this type himself? Perhaps he is too much of a "flat earther" to own or use telemetry RC gear... ??
  2. Maybe in the future, but it’s a 300 odd mile round trip so I will wait until I have an auto gyro that I can fly. Next year!
  3. Yes, I had seen that but it is the sort of placeholder that frequently gets auto generated during an acquisition, so wanted to hear from someone in the know within RCM&E.
  4. David, do you know if the new owners intend to pride any kind of printed back issue supply? My local stockists sold out of the recent edition with the Gyroo plan very quickly, and I'd like to pick up a copy if possible...
  5. This must have been pretty popular, I searched for the RCM&E about a week after publication in the local newsagents that normally stock it an it was all gone! Now waiting to see if the new owners can provide back issues...
  6. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    The Ami is a specific solution to a specific problem - a small, cheap, slow vehicle for urban hops that doesn't even reqire a license to drive in most countries (it's classified as a Quadricycle). Most will never leave a 30mph zone, so the top speed really isn't an issue. No, it won't suit lots of people, but it doesn't make it rubbish. It is better seen as an alternative to a cargo ebike than a traditional car tbh.
  7. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    I see what you are saying about it not being the best financial investment you could make, but the section in bold is not really true. Yes, you may well have a life expired battery system, but the PV would have another 15 years in it at that point. By the time our battery system expires in 10 years we will definitely have an EV with V2G capability, so I doubt we will need to replace it at all. Even if we did I fully expect the prices of those to have gone down in the intervening period as volumes increase. Also whilst you are right that no-one has a crystal ball re: future energy prices, look a the factors that are going to come into play in the next decade - mandated reduction in CO2 emissions for grid power and vehicles, political turmoil around Russia and almost all of our current domestic nuclear baseload going end of life. With that context it is hard how prices can return to previous levels, so in the med/long term it is highly likely we will be paying more for our energy from the grid as % of income. Being as energy independent as you can therefore does make sense even if the numbers are not as compelling a financial case as a stock market investment.
  8. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    There is an element of truth in that in terms of the models manufacturers are choosing to make at thsi point (large SUVs which their research says are more profitable), but it is also an oversimplification. The key issue at this point is that the costs of EV manufacturer are higher than IC due to the tech required and supply chain issues, and small EVs are disproportianately expensive as they still require all of the same tech, just a slightly smaller battery. This will get better with time, but we are probably all going to hae to accept that the cost of motoring is going to go up in the zero emissions era, whatever we choose to drive (EV, hydrogen or some other future technology).
  9. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    Yes, the batteries are now highly recycleable, and they can aslo be used in "second life" applications like running lifts, power banks etc once they have too little capacity for use as EV batteries. The Fully Charged channel has some content on this if you want to know more, but the tyre wear and brake wear issue is actually quite a big one that is not easily solved whichever propulsion is chosen...
  10. No, unfortunately there really isn't any argument to be had - all modules and TXs require a valid CE certificate to be sold, and the DJT no longer has one (it was removed in 2015 when the regs changed and Frsky did not get another one as they knew it could not legally pass, but despite that they have continued to sell it). The XJT has one but the DJT does not, and there is no way that this is "old stock" 7 years on. Your argument that illegal wifi kit is being sold today is undoubtedly true, but that doesn't really excuse Frsky IMO. DJT downloads page - no valid cert XJT - valid CE and FCC certs post 2015 Government page on CE markings... "Products that need CE marking CE marking is mandatory, but only for those products which are covered by the scope of one or more of the New Approach Directives. You can view the EC New Approach Directives guidance from the Europa website. Even if your product is manufactured outside the EEA, you must ensure the product bears CE marking if your product comes under the scope of a directive requiring CE Marking. Not all products sold in the EU need to bear CE marking. CE marking applies to products, ranging from electrical equipment to toys and from civil explosives to medical devices. The full list of these product categories is below: ...radio and telecommunications terminal equipment..." Only one conclusion can really be drawn; the thing I have never understood is why other manufacturers like HH have not pulled them up on it, they must be aware... ?
  11. Nice job. I would love to know how they arrived at that particular brand name...!
  12. Yep, I agree with all that. The short summary is that you are perfectly ok if operating on kit that was legal at the point of sale, which all yours was. What I have never been able to udnerstand is how Frsky dealers get away with selling the DJT after all this time, especially as it no longer has a valid CE cert... https://www.t9hobbysport.com/frsky-djt-2.4ghz-jr-telemetry-transmitter-module
  13. Very interesting Mike. So if I bought an X20 today, could I still utilise the additional ACCESS/TANDEM stuff like forward programming of RXs from within erskyTX and 900MHz backup if booted in erskyTX mode, or would I have to boot into ETHOS to do that? And presumably we'd need an MPM module scuh as the IRX one for use in erskyTX mode?
  14. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    Please, if posting statements like these as "facts", post a link to the source you got them from so we dont have to do that ourselves to determine if this is real or FUD. Thanks.
  15. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    There are almost no EV estates at this point, mainly because the manufacturers research has told them SUVs aregoing to sell better (don't shoot the messenger!). The MG5 is probably the most likely of what is onsale today, but that may still be too small and it's sticker WLTP range of 250 miles might be a bit tight for a fully loaded journey on the motorway on a cold day without charging. I suspect the 80KWh Skoda Enyaq or maybe the VW ID.4 would meet your needs, but you'd need to research that more specifically in terms of the load space. The Enyaq was definitely my favourite as a model carrier of the ones I looked at, but they start at £40k so don't get the government grant... (not even the 60KWh version does any more).
  16. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    I'm not sure why you posted such old costs which (as confirmed by others and my own experience of purchasing a large scale solar and battery install this year) are clearly no longer representative. Key points: Your install is 20x300W = 6KWp system . That's very big domestic system, probably 50% bigger than most install. So if we take your 2018 figures and scale them accordingly that means a representative installation in France back in 2018 would have been ~12,000 Euros / £10,250. We know panel costs have been reducing for decades, and that is no different in recent years. This site (updated April 2022) gives current representative UK figures, and puts a 4KWp system at £6-8k, or 7-9.4k Euros. That was before all VAT costs were dropped to zero in the last budget, so costs should be another 5% lower than that. Battery systems in 2018 were at a very early stage of development, and those costs appear to have dropped more than solar in the same period. I can't find any figures tracking this over time, but from talking to suppliers in the last few months all told me that the system 5KWh system we have bought is now half the cost of an equivalent sold in 2020. To give you some idea, our 5.76KWp system with a 5KWh battery was just under £12k / 14k Euros (not including the optional pigeon proofing!). VAT costs for batteries have also recently dropped to 0% in the UK making their install even more cost effective. So in summary, check by all means but your £30k estimate looks likely to be ~x bigger than the reality, unless there as some crazy taxations on solar in the EU/France we are not aware of?
  17. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    Why do you post this without any link for context and add your own (entirely invalid) FUD-inducing question? Anyone who reads what has been published can see this is nothing to do with the powertrain, it is the ABS system that is at fault... "These vehicles all use the same faulty component, called the Hydraulic Electronic Control Unit (HECU), that’s part of the anti-lock braking system (ABS), according to documents Kia provided to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The component is manufactured by Mando, a major automotive supplier. Neither automaker has determined the cause of the fires." https://www.consumerreports.org/car-recalls-defects/park-recalled-hyundai-kia-vehicles-outside-due-to-fire-risk-a1002120529/
  18. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    Of course it is likely to have some effect, and a full financial analysis would be handy (but pretty hard to do at this point, at least from the data avaialbe to us as private individuals). However, given the larger battery sizes in play in the newer EVs (frequently 60-80 KWh usable, often more) and the incredibly low C ratings of discharge we are talking about for V2L/V2G use, this should have a pretty small effect. Any negative impact on the EV cycle life will also be offset by the fact you won't need a 2-4KWh domestic battery, and the avoided costs of using premium electricity iof you are on a time of use tariff.
  19. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    V2L (vehicle to load) and V2G (vehicle to grid) are super important technologies, but the industry seems to be very slow to roll them out. The only off the shelf option for V2G is are in Nissans which use the CHAdeMO charging std; that allows a lot more communciationbetween the car and load (necesary to protect your battery in the long term), but doesn't charge as fast. CCS (the most common fast charging std) doesn't have that capability by default, but it is possible to do as these clever Dutch types in Utrecht have proved. Get on with it manufacturers...
  20. TBH at this point I would skip the X10 and buy either the new X18 or slightly pricier X20 that run the Frsky ETHOS system - it is probably closer to your A9 in terms of configuration approach, still miles more powerful, but also includes all Frsky's latest RF programming. Personally I find the X10 a rather uncomfortable hold, the new models feel much better in my hands and they will be supported for longer. The X18 is actually cheaper too... https://www.t9hobbysport.com/frsky-tandem-x18-dual-band-transmitter-frsky-tandem-x18-dual-band-transmitter---blue The obvious alternative is one of the MPM radios - with those ou are getting lots of flexibility in terms of RF protocols, but losing the more advanced ACCESS features (like over the air RX updates ) and TANDEM 2.4GHz /900MHz options of the new TXs. Only you can decide which will be more useful, but personally I would say having one (cheap) MPM radio would always be a good idea even if you do buy a new Frsky TX; with that in your back pocket even if you do retire your Hitec for any reason all the RXs remain useable.
  21. Short answer - no, not unless you put a JR shape multi-protocol module in the back. If you want multiprotocol support form a TX I would personally recommend a new transmitter, it tends to be a bit more fiddly getting the modules setup, sespecially ifyou regular swap between protocols.
  22. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    Yes, I am not sure that tariff is even available to join at thsi point. As we don't yet have an EV I am looking at the Octopus Outbound tariff which give 7.5p/kWh for export which is the best you can get at the moment by some margin, so whilst we are EV-less, it seems the logical choice. The other factor is that you will pay more in the day for anything you do use from the grid if you have a time of use tariff, so calculating the overall best choice is somewhat "fun". I suspect I will end up with a very complicated spreadsheet once our array starts creating electiricty, and data!
  23. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    Good to hear ?. We know that our battery won't be big enough to soak up all the excesss solar on good days, but we will have an EV within 18 months whcih will do that job whenever it is on the drive.
  24. MattyB

    Electric Cars.

    Missed this post earlier, and it definitely deserves a response... The short answer to your environmental costs question is "extremely good". Whilst I agree the overall environmental credentials of EVs in terms of lifecycle carbon emissions can be difficult to make work unless you were already a high mileage IC driver, that really isn't the case with solar. This is due to the advances in panel performance, durability and manufacture in the last 10 years + rapidly rising energy prices. Even if they are produced with the dirtiest coal (which I accept some of the cheaper panels probably are), solar panels today have such long operational lifespans and improved efficiency that they are massively carbon reducting over the course of their lifetime. To give you some idea here are real world stats (i.e. adjusted for specific geographic position in the UK, panel direction, shading etc.) for our install - it uses panels from REC, manufactured in Singapore or Norway, with a warranty offering >92% output guaranteed at 25 years: Caveats The carbon figures above don't include the battery system, as those weren't provided in the quote; this is purely for the solar panels and inverter setup Our installation is a big one, and is almost perfectly due south with no shading. Installations that aren't so well optimsed won't have quite such such good figures. So in summary our panels are carbon neutral after ~2 years in terms of pure manufacture. Even if we assume that a combination of "dirty" manufacture (which these definitely aren't, I've researched that) and the carbon cost of transport and installation double that figure, we are still only talking about a CO2 payback of a maximum of 4 years, but they will be generating for a minimum of 25 years, almost certainly longer. Yes you can argue there are better financial investments out there, but for us the value of being 80+% energy independent and knowing our bills can't really increase dramatically in the future is well worth that.
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