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Spektrum TX from Australia


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Don't forget that the UK is not in the EU anymore! There is no reason that non EU radio gear can not be used it will not cause any problem to others or yourself. There may have been a technical offence of importing a non compliant electronic device, but if it was not for the purpose of trade then I am not sure it applies. Scrape the label off and go flying. Other advice will be along soon I am sure.

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The US standard is different from the EU/UK standard (yes the UK still follows the EU standards for now, which the UK helped formulate), DSM2 transmission was non-compliant from 2015 (DSMx is fine) and the US also allowed a higher power output.

 

But unless you are planning to enter events/competitions where the legality of equipment maybe checked then you shouldn't have a problem, the multiprotocol radios you can buy from UK shops allow you to select non-compliant transmission modes. 

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The legality of using it may depend on the Australian market regulations which might allow higher power settings than the UK permits.  The possible fly in the ointment then could be your insurance which will not pay out against an illegal act.  I don't believe that operating a non-CE marked transmitter is illegal per se - unless it is outside specified RF standards which would leave you open to possible prosecution. As an end user, operating correctly marked equipment from a normal trade source gives you a pretty good defence in this matter.

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You cannot plead ignorance now you have asked the question and got the answers above!  Especially if you have put your real name to the question - a moments search by Google will reveal anything you have posted if any insurance claims person chooses to search.

The BMFA handbook states somewhere that the person importing the equipment is respnsible for ensuring it meets UK regulations.  

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Jason, the illegal set has the power to shoot you down, in a tight fight for a channel\signal. Unlikely, but can happen.


As you gather the bits do you;

dance, don’t worry squire

was that necessary you person, father unknown

assault him.


I’m not getting this permissive/lawless attitude to providing users a level playing field.

 

It is not lobotomization. It is making it legal.

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Hi Don,

The range of an EU dx9 is poor. I'd gladly use an international version. After all, they work great in all non EU countries around the world. 

Level playing field argument is nonsense. Many open TX type radios coming from vendors which I shall not name have been unknowingly purchased and used in the UK with international power levels and the sky has not fallen down yet. It really is a non-issue. Harry should just use the radio as-is, instead of wasting money to get it downgraded. 

 

Edited by Jason-I
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3 hours ago, Don Fry said:

Jason, the illegal set has the power to shoot you down, in a tight fight for a channel\signal. Unlikely, but can happen.


No it doesn’t - if it did TXs in the countries where higher powers are allowed would be causing shoot downs left right and centre! I suggest you read up on the various spread spectrum methods and how they operate, it will quickly become clear why your statement is incorrect:

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Sorry, to the lawbreaking advocates. But if one set has twice the power, at about 25  % greater range it has the same signal presence, and it’s signal pushes its weaker brethren aside. The weaker brethren then have to find a quieter bit to work in.
If your argument is correct why does high power military stuff come with caveats to ordinary users.

The inverse square law applies to all of creation.

BTW, please read my thread. I did say unlikely, but can happen. 

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As already pointed out, if the sticker says not for use in the EU then the radio is not for use in the EU. In the unlikely event that something serious happened whilst using the radio, the OP has stated that they know that the radio is not for use in the EU. It islikely that any insurance would be invalidated, at the very least. It doesn't actually matter whether there is any real, practical, increased risk to others in using the set, if it exceeds the EU (and UK) standards it is not legal to use. On a related theme, my understanding is that older Spektrum radios, which are DSM2 and DSMx capable, accrued grandfather rights for their continued operation, but that isn't the case in this example, which is explicitly marked as not for use in the EU.

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Can this forum allow people to post advice advocating breaking the law?   Surely not.   Threads have been moderated for far less!   

Authorities seem to be looking at ways of eliminating drones and if they find people are using illegal equipment then that will give them an excuse for further action which may affect us all.

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Note - The below is a technical discussion, not one of UK legality. I am not espousing anyone breaks the law, but some statements made above may lead readers to incorrectly conclude that they are at risk of being shotdown by transmitters not in their control that may be operating at slightly higher power than the UK limit.

 

10 hours ago, Don Fry said:

Sorry, to the lawbreaking advocates. But if one set has twice the power, at about 25  % greater range it has the same signal presence, and it’s signal pushes its weaker brethren aside. The weaker brethren then have to find a quieter bit to work in.

  1. OK, in that case please explain why there are not shootdowns happening left right and centre every time 2 or 3 models fly together in the UK with perfectly legal CE rated 100mw equipment then? The delta in signal strength you are talking about will be seen many, many times by each RX every time two or more models fly together. This is because their distance from the transmitting TX does not remain constant - one on a close fly by will see a far stronger signal from the TXs in operation than a model at 1km range. Strangely none of them fall from the sky, because it is not power that is the key factor in ensuring a reliable 2.4GHz link, it is the spread spectrum technologies employed by all sets sold today (I once unknowingly flew next to someone with an illegal 1W transmitter with precisely zero issues).
  2. Not all sets use FHSS, many utilise DSSS instead of or in addition to it. Such TXs do not therefore necessarily "move to a quieter bit"...

"Direct-sequence spread-spectrum transmissions multiply the data being transmitted by a pseudorandom spreading sequence that has a much higher bit rate than the original data rate. The resulting transmitted signal resembles bandlimited white noise, like an audio recording of "static". However, this noise-like signal is used to exactly reconstruct the original data at the receiving end, by multiplying it by the same spreading sequence (because 1 × 1 = 1, and −1 × −1 = 1). This process, known as despreading, is mathematically a correlation of the transmitted spreading sequence with the spreading sequence that the receiver already knows the transmitter is using. After the despreading, the signal-to-noise ratio is approximately increased by the spreading factor, which is the ratio of the spreading-sequence rate to the data rate.

While a transmitted DSSS signal occupies a much wider bandwidth than a simple modulation of the original signal would require, its frequency spectrum can be somewhat restricted for spectrum economy by a conventional analog bandpass filter to give a roughly bell-shaped envelope centered on the carrier frequency. In contrast, frequency-hopping spread spectrum pseudorandomly retunes the carrier and requires a uniform frequency response since any bandwidth shaping would cause amplitude modulation of the signal by the hopping code.

 

If an undesired transmitter transmits on the same channel but with a different spreading sequence (or no sequence at all), the despreading process reduces the power of that signal. This effect is the basis for the code-division multiple access (CDMA) property of DSSS, which allows multiple transmitters to share the same channel within the limits of the cross-correlation properties of their spreading sequences."

 

10 hours ago, Don Fry said:

If your argument is correct why does high power military stuff come with caveats to ordinary users.

 

Probably because military systems can be many, many orders of magnitude higher in power than commercially available ones, not a paltry 100mw. They may also use a wider range within the overall frequency spectrum.

 

Edited by MattyB
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Thank you Matty. As the saying goes, “if I agreed with you we would both be wrong”.

 

We therefore have to accept the the regulations, as imposed by the regulating authorities that maximum output levels are irrelevant, and it just don’t matter, what we use is fine. Their efforts are little more that regulators imposing stupid and useless regulation on free spirits pursuing freedom, wealth and happiness.

 

May your lift remain constant and free of turbulence.

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apart from the ins and outs been discussed,harrys original question,i would say if its for outside the Eu,dont use it in the uk,until you have checked it out with the authorities concerned...not the opinions of fellow modellers on a forum.....far better be safe than Sorry......for i fear if harry does have a mishap,no-one will back him up.

 

ken anderson...ne..1..safe than sorry dept. 

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Lets not forget that we are talking about toy radios. There are probably (almost certainly) tens of thousands of non EU compliant radios & video transmitters currently in operation in the UK with no adverse effects. I even own and use some of these non-compliant devices (legacy devices purchased before the rules changed). This is hardly the crime of the century!

 

I can guarantee many, many users of this forum have broken EU rules at some point. For example, people with diabetes are not supposed to drive. Children under 8 years old are not allowed to blow up balloons.  How many of you have called a meat and potato pasty a 'Cornish' pasty even if it has not come from Cornwall?  How many farm shops still sell a 'dozen' eggs. 

 

Not to mention breaking UK laws - how many of us have sounded our car horn in anger at another motorist? Now that is lawlessness.....

 

 

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Jason, and I'm not picking on you, but the problem with operating these non compliant radios, in a regulated system, is the bite end of a standard deviation curve, results in problems. Someone says, I've done this, I got away with it,  is not an answer, or proof , that they are at the bite end of the curve. 
Most problems on 2.4 ghz results in not much, yer wireless speaker is not cooperating. We have a more expensive fails. And I don’t see why we applaud, or cordon  it.

Stick to legal kit.

 

Ps. I live in France. A dozen , French derived word, is as common as ten, in a box. I don’t comment on a Cornish pasty. Properly cooked, very good, but not often. When I’m next in Brixham, any indicators would be welcome. Don’t mention the shops facing the harbour.

Edited by Don Fry
Useless spelling
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1 hour ago, Jason-I said:

I can guarantee many, many users of this forum have broken EU rules at some point. For example, people with diabetes are not supposed to drive. Children under 8 years old are not allowed to blow up balloons.  How many of you have called a meat and potato pasty a 'Cornish' pasty even if it has not come from Cornwall?  How many farm shops still sell a 'dozen' eggs. 

 

 

 

 

But none of these examples are EU rules. ? 

Edited by PatMc
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