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Op I D info display


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After a 2 hour search I finally found the bit of info I need.

 

It's come from the horse's mouth ( caa site ) but may have been "Amended".

 

Please can the forum confirm that the op id number should be in block capitals ( makes sence ) with characters higher than 3mm ( bit small imo ) ?

 

I know it must be visible from outside the model ( makes sence ) and/or accessable without the need for tools...mmmm.

 

Visible thru "windows"...

 

Thanks, just checking in case I looked in the wrong place.

 

Maybe this info should be quoted with the quote about it in bumf like 2022 quick start sheets etc..

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IMO largely thanks to folks who sought a proscriptive definition of what constituted a special tool the OP ID label, if inside the model, needs to be accessible by hand, without even using a screwdriver. It must also be on the main part of the model - so you couldn't have it just on a removable hatch or plate.  Minimum 3mm high letters and I guess you would use capitals rather than lower case, since that is how the number is issued.

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from a 2 min search https://register-drones.caa.co.uk/labelling-drones

 

Your operator ID must be:

  • visible from the outside, or within a compartment that can easily be accessed without using a tool
  • clear and in block capitals taller than 3mm
  • secure and safe from damage
  • on the main body of the aircraft

 

on my planes with an enclosed cockpit I put them inside visible through one of the windows, open cockpit planes have them in the cockpit and in electric models i put them in the battery compartment as the hatches don't need any tools to remove them.

Edited by Frank Skilbeck
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Everything is easy when you know how.

 

On the above picture, why not include the minimum hieght of the characters as well ?

 

Anyways guys thanks.

 

Re reading the stuff in search of my questions answer did no harm.

 

Off to buy a "Dyno" machine and spare tape as I now have 3 jobs to use it on, one being making tags for a car wiring problem.

 

Also a new hole punch for the cable tags/identifiers.

Edited by Rich Griff
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I'm not sure I'd use Dymo tape, especially as you're likely to have a different number each year.

 

I use small Avery self adhesive labels, the size sold for putting labels on 35mm slides.  They do a template for MS Word, which makes printing off a whole bunch easy.

 

L7656-100 is the reference, I think.  84 labels per sheet, so you could print for the whole club!

Edited by Allan Bennett
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52 minutes ago, Allan Bennett said:

I'm not sure I'd use Dymo tape, especially as you're likely to have a different number each year.

 

I use small Avery self adhesive labels, the size sold for putting labels on 35mm slides.  They do a template for MS Word, which makes printing off a whole bunch easy.

 

L7656-100 is the reference, I think.  84 labels per sheet, so you could print for the whole club!

You arent likely to have a new number every year. Once you have the new format GBR-OP- number (all current ones are this format) it is highly unlikley to change.

DYMO labels are perfect for the job.

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I use Dymo labels - but to clarify, they are the new style Dymo labels which print out onto a roll of self adhesive paper tape about 10mm wide. NOT the old style embossed plastic Dymo labels that were around in the 70's, where the label maker punched the characters into the hard plastic tape. 

Printing on self adhesive labels with a computer is an alternative, but I went with the Dymo labeller because I can also print the labels on clear plastic film for those models where the label has to be on the outside, when I usually put it underneath the tail.

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I wonder if Allan was thinking of the traditional stress induced lettering hard tape?  I’ve found my modern cassette type labeller (Brother, but I believe modern Dymo are very similar) absolutely perfect for the job - and a myriad of others such as labelling servo leads, workshop drawers,  containers etc. 

 

Edit: Great minds, Leccy?

Edited by Martin Harris - Moderator
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I have a Brother printing machine for which you can buy assorted tapes and also ink colours. It's very good. 8n addition I understand that this year OP Numbers will be yours for the duration. 

Why they couldn't have used BMFA membership numbers I don't know.

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2 hours ago, Zflyer said:

Why they couldn't have used BMFA membership numbers I don't know.

As a member of EASA it was necessary for the CAA to comply with international standardisation. That’s why our numbers start with GBR. The previous change was because the CAA format didn’t comply but there’s no foreseeable reason for it to change again. 

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I just type the OP number into Word on the PC and duplicate it many times so I can print out on an A4 sheet of paper.

Then cut with scissors and stick number side down onto a strip of sellotape then the excess sellotape around the outside sticks to wherever I want on the model.  Number is protected with clear tape and removable if I sell the model or the number changes and 30 or 40 on a sheet of A4 plus tape costs next to nothing.

John M

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The label printers advertising on eBay and BMFA can be seen charging a fiver for a dozen labels. Even without self adhesive labels the method described above of printing an A4 sheet of labels, cutting them out and sticking a piece of Sellotape over the top is very easy to do.  I suppose if one is flying IC sports models, with the labels on the outside, with them needing to be fuel proof, is the most likely explanation.

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19 hours ago, Martin Harris - Moderator said:

I wonder if Allan was thinking of the traditional stress induced lettering hard tape? ....

Quite right, I didn't know there were other kinds of Dymo labels!

 

Good to hear that our numbers may not change again.  My supply of Avery labels should see me out then ?

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21 hours ago, leccyflyer said:

The label printers advertising on eBay and BMFA can be seen charging a fiver for a dozen labels. Even without self adhesive labels the method described above of printing an A4 sheet of labels, cutting them out and sticking a piece of Sellotape over the top is very easy to do.  I suppose if one is flying IC sports models, with the labels on the outside, with them needing to be fuel proof, is the most likely explanation.

 

Yep, and, unless inks have improved, sunlight will cause the print to fade on the home-printed ink-jet version.  Possibly worth sealing the edge, especially on foam models, to help stop the Sellotape lifting.

 

The vinyl'y ones I bought stick really well, and have not faded at all. 

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Mine are ink-jet printed and I always give them a quick spray with varnish before peeling from the sheet, to ensure they're rainproof.  
 

Never noticed any problem with fading, and I've been using inkjet printing for many years for vinyl and waterslide decals.  Maybe that depends on the ink brand -- I use HP original.

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