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Cleaning old 2 strokes - Where do I start?


Andy C
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I keep a Kilner Jar of "red" diesel in the garage. If I get an engine that is seized solid with old oil, I leave it soaking in that for a few days (remove the glow-plug and back-plate). That usually gets it to turn over. "Contaminated" diesel from a friendly garage (drained from diesel cars that have been filled with petrol) works even better and is usually cheaper!

 

This will usually also soften a lot of the gunk on the exterior of the engine.

 

However you do it, you will end up having to use a fair bit of elbow grease...!

 

--

Pete

 

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On 31/03/2022 at 11:38, Paul De Tourtoulon said:

Life is to short to clean planes and engines, as long as they don't dirty my car,,,,?

So I’ve owned my current car for 10 years, built in 2008. Properly serviced, fit for purpose, not (often for many thousands of kliks) thrashed.  Last autumn, SHMBO was complaining, it’s encrusting her clothes. I don’t clean cars, period.

So she went to a valeter/detailer. He said he knew the car, we are near neighbours, unknown to us. He recognized the algae deposits. She promised to be better in future.
But, a plane motor. It runs, a problem?

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Some fuel residue, non castor based fuels, when baked on, is very difficult to remove. It's as if it has a clear "glaze"...

 

For castor based fuels I find petrol will shift it. Get a large necked jar, like a gerkin jar, and place the engine in that for a day or two. Agitate the jar by shaking from time to  time. You will see the " crap" collect at the bottom of the jar. It can be filtered and reused till "spent".

 

Interestingly someone posted about petrol contaminated diesel.....

 

Obviously don't use petrol indoors or in a sonic cleaner, it's highly flamable and a very real fire risk, SO BE WARNED !!!

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My experience with an ultrasonic cleaner using just water was disappointing. Nothing like Frank's engine experience.  Soaking engine in old/stale glow fuel and scrubbing with a toothbrush helps.  Cooking the parts in a slow cooker filled with anti-freeze liquid (outside in a well-ventilated garage with door open) got loads of baked on muck off. The engine was really very clean and almost like new afterwards.

Edited by David Ovenden
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Warm ethylene glycol antifreeze is good for cleaning castor oil stains off engines and exhausts.

 

I read it somewhere (maybe on this esteemed forum, previous post excepted), tried it, and found it works a treat with a bit of scrubbing with an old toothbrush, where no other solvent or cleaning fluid would.

 

I’ve got several engines sparkling again with this method now, but you do have to be careful, as ethylene glycol is flammable and gives off toxic fumes when heated, so do it outside.

 

Edited by EvilC57
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Boiling in ethylene glycol antifreeze worked extremely well for me - however it also removed most of the red on both my Irvine 53's leaving a very un manly pink tinge ? 

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