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kc

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  1. Thanks Nigel. It's alway fun to study a plan so it's not really work - just armchair aeromodelling. I have now put this list on the Ohmen thread as well with very slight amendments to the ply sizes to allow for a couple of unnoticed parts ( wing bolt seat and also wing bolt protection on wing itself)
  2. On another thread someone asked for a material list, so I will repeat it here also for anyone who builds this in future. This is just an estimate and is just the minimum amount, so it relies on good planning of balsa use. Balsa 48 inch 1/16 by 4 2 pcs 48 inch 1/4 sq 3pcs 36 inch 3/16 by 4 1 pc 36 inch 5/16 by 3 1 pc 36 inch 3/32 by 4 5pcs 36 inch 1/8 by 4 2pcs 36 inch 1/16 by 4 2pcs 36 inch 1/4 by 4 1pcs ( laminate 2 thickness to make the 1/2 for cowl and with some 1/8 to make 3/8 ) or buy a sheet of 1/2 and one of 3/8 if you prefer, although there would be a lot of excess material. Spruce 1/8 by 1/4 36 inch length 1 pc birch ply 1/32 16 inch by 8 birch ply 1/16 4inch by 6 lite ply 1/8 11inch by 6 birch ply 1/8 11 inch by 3 piano wire 10SWG 36 inch plus I would order an extra sheet of 1/16 , 3/32 and 1/8 just in case.
  3. Of course if the 48 inch means a higher carriage charge then it may not be worthwhile. Damage to longer stuff in transit might also be a consideration. If collecting in person this may not apply but the overriding factor is whether a nice piece of balsa ( bendable in the case of wing sheeting ) is available or it's better to look at the 36 inch stock. Masher - lets hope the OP has actually seen this material list!
  4. Cheaper because there is less waste with 48 inch spars because you only need 3 lengths while 36 inch would need 6 lengths and give waste that's not needed for this model. £3.06 pounds compared to 5.16 pounds with 36 inch. The 48 inch sheet also provide the TE material and seems more convenient, although the 1/16 waste could be utilised on this model. And if you want to make the wing in one piece with no dihedral it's easier ( this wing is very similar to the Swamp Rat wing which is flat and one piece, therefore quicker to build. ) It's the builders choice - use 36 inch or 48 inch for these parts
  5. The other aspect to buying balsa is the grade - SLEC offer soft, mediun or hard. I suppose medium for this model in most places, but if you can select the wood in person at a show or their works then I suggest - for the wing sheeting (48 by 4 ) get two sheets that will bend easily across the grain. similarly one of the 3/32 sheets will be used for top decking so that also needs to bend easily. But the other 3/32 will be used for fuselage sides - needs 2 identical sheets - and 2 for ribs, so medium weight but stiff sheets. The 3/16 sheet will be used for tailplane, elevator, fin and rudder so a nice light sheet is needed but not one that is so soft it dents under slight finger pressure. Worth sifting through a few sheets to get the right piece, if you can select yourself. The 48 inch 1/4 sq needs to be really hard balsa for the 2 spars. Personally I would choose spruce for this part or I would buy 6mm sq 'pine' from B&Q etc mouldings section. Look for the 'finger jointing' so it's not in the wrong place and also check it's not warped or has missing corners. Just a couple of inches of 1/4 dowel are needed too.
  6. Revised my estimate slightly after going over the plan again ( needs 5/16 for ailerons -not 3/16 and only needs 3 pcs of 1/4 sq 48inch ) new estimate quantity Balsa 48 inch 1/16 by 4 2 pcs 48 inch 1/4 sq 3pcs 36 inch 3/16 by 4 1 pc 36 inch 5/16 by 3 1 pc 36 inch 3/32 by 4 5pcs 36 inch 1/8 by 4 2pcs 36 inch 1/16 by 4 2pcs 36 inch 1/4 by 4 1pcs ( laminate 2 thickness to make the 1/2 for cowl and with some 1/8 to make 3/8 ) or buy a sheet of 1/2 and one of 3/8 if you prefer not to save money! Spruce 1/8 by 1/4 36 inch length 1 pc birch ply 1/32 16 inch by 8 birch ply 1/16 4inch sq lite ply 1/8 11inch by 6 birch ply 1/8 9 inch by 4 piano wire 10SWG 36 inch plus I would order an extra sheet of 1/16 , 3/32 and 1/8 just in case.
  7. That same CAP plan is on Outerzone and this also has links to a recent build log using a Saito 80 and retracts.
  8. Correction. I had not noticed the 1/32 birch ply doubler - 16 inches by 7 is needed. If buying by post I would buy a 48 inch sheet which would help protect the 48 inch balsa from snapping in the post. The extra will always come in handy for another model.
  9. My calculations are that the balsa would come to about 49 pounds and the spruce & ply 8 pounds ( buying a sq ft of each ply size which should do a couple of models or maybe 3 ) and the piano wire 1.78 pounds if bought from SLEC or balsa Cabin. So about half the Sarik price if you cut the ribs and ply yourself ( not difficut with all ribs much the same and mostly straight sided formers - real aeromodelling!) It will be cheaper to use some of the 1/8 birch ply doubled to make the 1/4 u/c mounts or you could buy a sheet of 1/4 birch ply instead if you don't have any odd bits around. You could economise and use any handy offcuts of DIY ply instead of birch or even the lite ply but birch is nicer to work and dosn't splinter as much. If you cannot get 48 inch lengths then you need double the quantity of 36 inch and end up with lots of offcuts. In any case order a couple of extra sheets of the main sizes just in case of errors. Postage is expensive if you have to reorder some bits and it's better to have the balsa in stock for repairs or the next model.
  10. notes.... dont forget motor bulkhead triangular bracing ( not shown on plan but essential ) you could order a length of tri balsa but I suggest a 12mm sq bit of hardwood or firm softwood you may find at home some items like wing ribs are on the Coquette plan side of the free pull out plan. I think it was suggested that the tailplane and fin could be solid balsa - there should be enough in my estimate. order wing bolts and captive nuts also motor captive nuts.
  11. My rough estimate is ..... Balsa 48 inch 1/16 by 4 2 pcs 48 inch 1/4 sq 4pcs 36 inch 3/16 by 4 2pcs 36 inch 3/32 by 4 5pcs 36 inch 1/8 by 4 2pcs 36 inch 1/16 by 4 2pcs 36 inch 1/4 by 4 1pcs ( laminate 2 thickness to make the 1/2 for cowl and with some 1/8 to make 3/8 ) or buy a sheet of 1/2 and one of 3/8 if you prefer not to save money! Spruce 1/8 by 1/4 36 inch length 1 pc birch ply 1/16 4inch sq lite ply 1/8 11inch by 6 birch ply 1/8 9 inch by 4 piano wire 10SWG 36 inch Buy an extra sheet of most sizes to allow for anything I missed and buy any fittings, wheels etc at same time to save postage. You may need to buy a sq ft of each size ply but it will be enough for a model or two. Don't blame me if I made any errors! - check for yourself if there is any size not specified by me. There should be enough if you carefully plan how to use the balsa - trial fit the ribs etc to get as many as possible from the sheet. Cut larger parts first so smaller bit come from offcuts e.g.wing TE come from offcuts of wing sheeting. LE is cut from sheet before other parts of 1/8. 48 inch sheets seem most economical for the wing sheeting.
  12. Well I don't think the average club member wants to encourage new people into the hobby! Experienced club members know that flying fields in the south of England are disaappearing fast and the population is increasing fast too, so it's not very desirable to attract more flyers to fewer fields! Most clubs want to kept the numbers down to give existing members flying time and minimise nuisance to neighbours. It might be a different situation in other parts of Briitain or in France etc with less population and much more open space but in the south of England many clubs do not want new members!
  13. Quite a few years ago club I belonged to proposed a joining fee. I opposed it and even though I was chairman and voted against it the committee passed the rule. The reason for the joining fee was to get members to renew their club fees within the first 2 months of the new year - it had been found that some members were likely not to pay their fees until the treasurer found them at the field and demanded they pay up. It was thought that some members never paid and just flew when they thought the treasurer would not be around! Actually there was only 1 member who was named as doing that. But of course not paying the club fees also meant the ( non ) member didnt pay BMFA membership fee to the club either and therefore was not insured as far as we knew. This convinced the committtee to pass the joining fee rule. In effect the joining fee meant the club 'fined' those who tried to evade paying their fee unless caught. I still oppose the rule in principle but concede that it has some merit. I expect that most clubs have the joining fee for exactly the same reason even if they don't explain it and just say it's for paperwork or keys etc.
  14. The remaining question is what are those extra linkages for? The linkages that appear to be on the elevator link arm ( although it might be rudder not elev)
  15. I have never seen anything quite like that! But my guess is it's to hold a load like a parachute or toffees or similar to the underside of the wing and then release the load. Or even a towline for a glider. Possibly rubber bands on the rod might have tensioned the 'string' before it was released. Toffee bombers were once a popular event at RC shows and hordes of children chased after the dropped toffees.
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