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Soldering.


David Barker 2
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There have been a zillion debates about this since the banning of lead in the UK and the impression we get is given the choice, electronics manufacturers and those in the  trade would go back to using and selling lead if the law allowed it so as you are asking a simple question my simple answer is lead with rosin flux. Failing that you have no choice but to use lead free solder.

 

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Hi David,

 

the 60/40 solder that Dwain mentioned is the stuff I use all the time, absolutely fine.

 

top tip....when you solder your multiplex plugs, plug a male and female together during the soldering process.

 

if you accidentally overheat a pin when soldering the plastic will soften and the pin may no longer be straight and you may not be able to rejoin them, but keeping them paired together will keep the male pin straight when the plastic cools again.

 

ask me how I know ? 

Edited by Craig Carr
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4 hours ago, Craig Carr said:

Hi David,

 

The 60/40 solder that Dwain mentioned is the stuff I use all the time, absolutely fine.

 

top tip....when you solder your multiplex plugs, plug a male and female together during the soldering process.

 

if you accidentally overheat a pin when soldering the plastic will soften and the pin may no longer be straight and you may not be able to rejoin them, but keeping them paired together will keep the male pin straight when the plastic cools again.

 

ask me how I know ? 

+1. I use XT60's and do the same. Very easy to get a wonky plug.     

D.D.

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I use one of these, 60 watt, comes with a load of different bits, accurate temperature control, nice silicone cable, seems well made. A clone of something. Chinese rubbish, unfortunatly. About £50 to £60 from memory.

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Edited by Don Fry
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When I was a PCB and equipment repair tech in the early 90's I tried the early incarnation of leadless solder - it was pretty hopeless TBH, but over the last thirty years things have moved on and the last stuff that I tried was fine.

Edited by Cuban8
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Not so Brian, the use of lead, and other substances in manufactured items is restricted by RoHS. These regs do not however cover domestic/DIY use of lead solder. The use of lead based solder and components in plumbing was banned some time before the RoHS directives.

RoHS stands for Restriction of Hazardous Substances. RoHS, also known as Directive 2002/95/EC, originated in the European Union and restricts the use of specific hazardous materials found in electrical and electronic products (known as EEE).

Edited by BackinBlack
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I wouldn't  use any of the lead free solders available its horrible stuff, doesnt flow as nice and needs more heat. Just my opinion. Multicore fluxed solder is a good all round solder. Any decent 60-40 Tin-Lead mix will be ok .

Look for a weller 85W iron for soldering larger gauge wires and undercarriage wires. 

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23 hours ago, BackinBlack said:

Not so Brian, the use of lead, and other substances in manufactured items is restricted by RoHS. These regs do not however cover domestic/DIY use of lead solder. The use of lead based solder and components in plumbing was banned some time before the RoHS directives.

RoHS stands for Restriction of Hazardous Substances. RoHS, also known as Directive 2002/95/EC, originated in the European Union and restricts the use of specific hazardous materials found in electrical and electronic products (known as EEE).

Thanks for that, I appreciate that domestic is often different from commercial but that doesn't make buying some products any easier.

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I was just soldering a couple of MPX plugs onto lipos this morning, using lead free solder (all I had) and an 80 watt iron, no problems. Tips, do one wire at a time, make sure you have the heat shrink on first wire before doing the 2nd, tin both wire end and plug pins and as recommended above have male and female plugs plugged together.

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