Jump to content

My Next Assembly ..... The Arising Star.


toto
 Share

Recommended Posts

So ..... still 9n holiday but casting my mind forward 5o what will be around the corner on my return. 

 

I'm currently learning on a mixture of my FMS Beaver, a trainer model which belongs to my club, and a Boomerang that belongs to my current instructor.

 

Before I came away on holiday, our club picked up another 5 or so new members, all of which require training. I think the club will be sharing out trai ing duties between all 6 of us and I can see the club trainer being in demand. 

 

I currently have my FMS Beaver which is awaiting an elevator repair on my return but have also de aided to start assembling ( note, not building ) another of my trainere ..... the " Arising Star " which I more or less just purchased before coming on holiday. ( from where I post ).

 

So on my return .... repair the abeaver and then ....... the Arising Star begins. So far .... a Force 0.46 two stroke glow engine and 4 or possibly 5 JR standard servos depending if I do away with any Y lead for the ailerons etc. ( which I plan to ).

 

I have a Spektrum AR610 for a receiver and a battery for the receiver, I will also be installing a switch to cut off power to the battery which has a charging point combined within the same unit to save removing the battery for charging. Ther will also be a filter between the tank and the carburetor and one on the incoming fuel feed line.

 

There doesn't appear to be too much of an assembly element to it but it will be my first taste of marking up to teim the surface film for applying the epoxy etc and of course, setting up the servo 's correctly and introducing an engine into the mix. 

 

There is no rush with this and I will take my time, no doubt asking questions as I go. I will have the Beaver to fly so this can just go at my own pace. I'm just eager to get  living with something whilst I gain my wings.

 

Looking forward to starting this sometime soon after my retur at the start of July.

 

Toto

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by toto
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After reading Adrian Smith's thread re the capiche, his posting turned to the subject of turnbuckles and other forms of control connection types. 

 

I was immediately interested as I dont know what type of connections and fastenings come with the Arising Star but surmise it will be rods with z bends and standard control horn connections. I also did not want to hijack Adrian's thread as I think it will be a good read to follow without my mutterings contaminating a nice build thread.

 

I will look and see what the Arising Star co es with when I get back I to the UK but meanwhile want to consider the various options and the most suitable for strength, reliability and adjustability. With regards to the last on the list there, I think that where tirnbuckles may come in handy if I have my understanding of what they actually are correct.

 

The one thing I'd rather avoid, is z bends. I dont like the look of them. I think the connection whilst probably the most secure, will also have the greatest potential for slop to be introduced into the system. The next consideration is ease 9f adjustment and fine adjustment which is where the turnbuckle may have its place. Ball joints ...... how reliable are these ?

 

Again, to anyone who knows me this far, I am a RC virgin so a lot to learn and just trying to understand the options available, their pro's and con's etc. Not trying to look for problems that dont exist. 

 

As far as this Arising Satrs assembly goes, there is not much to it ( not meaning it is potentially error free, I'll give the model the respect it is due ). 

 

After the hinging and general installation of the control surfaces, you are right into the servos and control mechanisms so I would like to settle on if I use those provided or if I want to buy any additional alternatives to not only having the model running as sweet as possible but also make for easy adjustments etc.

 

Thanks to Adrian for bringing this subject up in his thread. I'll ask away until my heart is content here rather than muck up what looks to be a great thread on the capiche.

 

Cheers

 

Toto

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Arising Star comes with the same fittings as a Boomerang.

 

Push rods are threaded one end for the control horn clevis, plastic clevis's are provided but I changed mine to good quality metal versions adding a locknut. The other end is straight unthreaded so your choice of connection at the servo end. I've used z bends at the servos ends without issue, countless flights and now practicing for my B and they're still running without any slop.

 

IMO you're heading for quite a bit of extra work if you want to use two servos in the wing and on such a plane I'm not sure why they would be needed. There is a single servo tray provided in the centre of the wing from which the push rods connect to torque rods pre-installed in the ailerons. You'll need to open the wing up, build in servos trays, work out how to connect the pushrods to the ailerons and make good the covering.

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The manual is available here if you want to look at it before your return.

 

I agree totally with PDB's comments. I'd be inclined to replace the plastic clevis's with metal ones, eg these & z bends instead of the servo connector supplied. Contrary to your belief the z bend has zero slop when done correctly, preferably using the correct tool,  as the bend produces a slight interference fit in the servo arm hole.  

 

If you do use the supplied servo arm connector do use thread lock to prevent the grub screw working loose. Indeed as any IC powered model is subject to constant vibration it is good practice to use thread lock on all bolts.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forgot to add the throttle push rod provided does come with a Z bend on the end which I replaced with a ball link and used a Dubro EZ connector at the servo end as the provided connector wasn't great quality.

 

Also they have the same tank as the Boomerang and the two I've had out of the box with neither could I get leak free seal so replaced it with a SLEC tank.

Edited by PDB
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that.

 

I'll take your advise. Are the pushrods 2mm out of curiosity ?

 

Just to know which size ball links or clevis's to get.

 

I'll also check out the SLEC tanks. Do these come in the same shape or is it just something similar? And do they come with there own fuel line fitments. I'll have a look on their website anyway but just gives confidence to know I choose the correct product.

 

Toto

Edited by toto
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, toto said:

Are the pushrods 2mm out of curiosity ?

 

Just to know which size ball links or clevis's to get.

 

I'll also check out the SLEC tanks. Do these come in the same shape or is it just something similar? And do they come with there own fuel line fitments. I'll have a look on their website anyway but just gives confidence to know I choose the correct product.

 

Toto

The pushrods are M2, although IIRC the throttle pushrod was of a smaller diameter but I replaced it.

 

Re tanks I used one of these https://www.slecuk.com/fuel-tanks, I can't remember which one but just got the one closest in measurement to the one provided and they come with all fitments.

 

The assembly order didn't make sense to me, they tell you to install the undercarriage and engine prior to the fin, tailplane, servos and other associated internal stuff, I found it's easier leaving them until last.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks  PDB 

 

I briefly looked through the destructions and to be honest, I'd rather get the tail surfaces and wings prepped first to get the gluing, hinging etc out the way. I will double and triple read the destructions again to ensure that there is no disadvantage of doing this prior to fitting control mechanisms etc. The engine ( too me ) could be done last.

 

Again, I'll probably seek advice once I get to the point of physically starting the assembly. The same with establishing the C of G. I know its stated in the destructions but I'm sure someone will maybe know of  " ultimate " solution. 

 

I think that adding the weight of the engine first may just make the model less easy to handle as you manouvre it to try and fit the rest. Much easier if its kept as light as possible.... in my inexperienced opinion. :classic_biggrin:

 

Always willing to be corrected though.

 

Many thanks kind Sir.

 

Toto

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did have a brief look at the destructions and wondered about the methodology of the two servo possibility. I did not get very far due to preparing for ho.idays and tying up business ends etc. My initial thoughts were .... how is it done ? 

 

It did occur that it may mean the risk of serious surgery which, to be honest, may, at this time be unwise with the ever present risk of completely messing it up. However, maybe the two mini servos in the one hatch, as you suggest, may be the way. ..... if I chicken out ..... it may be as the destructions suggest. Thanks for suggesting the option though. That's what it's all about.

 

Many thanks

 

Toto

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Modellers are a funny lot, what one might use would make another cringe. Z bends done with the correct tool are fine by me, plastic clevices go in the bin unless on small stuff where the choice is not there, slop ? you'll get a bit with clevices on the pin, grub screw doodahs only on lightweight stuff for me or throttles, solder adaptor so you've thread both ends, I use and trust those.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As others have said, Z bends, done with a nice pair of good quality Z bend pliers and with the correct size hole drilled in the nylon servo disc or arm are amongst the most foolproof and slop-free of linkages in my experience. Clevises are a matter or personal preference in terms of the materials used, whether plastic, nylon, steel, aluminium with a grub screw and whether they have a moulded or crimped in pin, or a separate metal pin. You should always have a good look at what is supplied with the kit and make a judgement whether they are fit for purpose. 

 

For a trainer I'd tend to agree with those saying keep it simple and go with a single standard full sized servo and torque rods, if that is what the kit is designed for. It's unlikely that you will be wanting any fancy flaperon or spoileron mixing and such simple single centrally mounted servo set ups have been serving us for a long time.

Edited by leccyflyer
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  Nothing a matter with a single center servo for aileron on a strip aileron trainer like the Arising Star, tens of thousands have flown like that. And if it is thought some differential is needed this can be done the mechanical method with positions of pushrods on the servo disc or star. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks chaps, as always, plenty of feed back. Admittedly, due to being .... erm .... new .... fresh meat etc, I'll need to digest it but I dont think this is the most difficult of subjects .... more one of preference and experience. .... I'm thinking the old Z bend may well stay. I think they are pre- formed anyway.

 

I'll stick with the single standard servo also. I know the servos I have are HD metal geared versions rated at 11.1Kg so ..... they'll move a horse if required.

 

I'll look at the SLEC fuel tank on my return.

 

Cheers

 

Toto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just downloaded the manuals for the Arising Star and it makes no mention of having to glue aileron, elevator or rudder hinged surfaces .... is that correct ? I could have sworn when I had a brief look in the box that they had to be done ?

 

Toto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, toto said:

Just downloaded the manuals for the Arising Star and it makes no mention of having to glue aileron, elevator or rudder hinged surfaces .... is that correct ?

It does on pages 4 and 5, all hinges need gluing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Obviously skipped that bit. 

 

Thanks for pointing it out. It's the part I am dreading to be honest. It'll probably work out no problem as well. I've read of folks using vaseline on the surrounding area's to prevent CA getting between the two wing surfaces.  I may try that .

 

Toto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toto

 

I always get the engine/motor mounted into the fuselage as you need to turn the fuselage over or around when doing the job.  Having the tailplane and elevator fitted gives you the chance of damaging them while working on the engine installation.  

 

An excellent tool when drilling the mounting holes for the engine is a Dead Centre drill.  Link.  Drill one hole and bolt the engine in place and then mark and drill the other 3 holes.  Remove the engine and drill out the holes you have marked.  That way, you won't end up with having to drill oversize holes to get all 4 bolt holes in the right place!  This product is from Great Planes but there might be others around as well.  I bought mine 20 years ago and it's a huge help.

 

An alternative to the Z bend is a simple 90 degree bend with an end keeper that fits over the end of the pushrod and then rotates to clip onto the straight part of the pushrod.  Link.

 

Peter

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Peter,

 

I suppose it just shows there are advantages both ways. What you say makes sense as I know when building the Beaver that when turning the model upside down to access the battery hatch, the tail plane took a hit now and again although fortunately never damaged.

 

The centering tool looks a handy piece of kit as well. I'll look into one of these. For all that they cost it is worth it. I checked out the other link for the push rod termination and I'll think about these too. Once again, thanks for posting up the link.

 

Toto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When using pinned hinges in ailerons, I coat just the hinge in a little grease with a toothpick. A little epoxy on the flat part of the hinge and push it home into the wing. Having previously cut the slots in the ailerons and having assembled the structure dry to make sure that everything fits as it should, once the epoxy has dried I repeat the process on the aileron. Any form of grease will work. I've even used butter when nothing else was available!

 

Once everything is in place and the glue has dried I drill the hinges vertically and pin them in place with a toothpick then I use cyano to make a permanent job of it..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Furry hinges are really easy and more than up to the task of holding a trainer together. Don't discount them.

 

Z bends made with the proper tool are excellent.

 

Opinions vary, but I will happily use good quality nylon clevis on a model bigger than this. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What servos do you have toto?

 

Regarding aileron setup, I use torque rods and central standard servo by choice on most builds. Works very well, simple, cheap, externally "clean", only needs one servo. 

Edited by Nigel R
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...