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Lipo State


Zflyer
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I am sure that other users of battery powered models may have a way of distinguishing between those that are charged and useable, and those discharged after use. I sue the below
I also use the same method to show which lipo's I have on storage.
All of my batteries have a strip of velcro (hook and loop) attached to them to aid in the positioning whilst in the model.
I use a small strip, suitably coloured, to place on the battery to identify its state, i.e. red = discharged, yellow = storage. No strip means the lipo is charged and ready for use. You could add green for this purpose if so desired.
You can paint the back of the strip or use coloured electrical tape or even coloured paper sticking it directly to the rear of the self adhesive of the velcro (hook and loop).
I keep them on a strip in the lid of my ammo boxes, which i use for storage and transporting.

Lipo ID.jpg

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I've always used doobers on the positive male pin of my 4mm connectors -it prevents accidental shorts. A short length of blue Sullivan Gold 'n Rod snake outer is a perfect fit. I have dozens of these in the flight box and Lipo Sack. For charged packs they are painted green, for discharged pack they are their natural blue colour. I also check the individual cell voltage every time before and after each flight with a Battery Doctor meter, similar to the one above.

I also have separate Lipo Sacks for charged and discharged packs. When I get back from flying any discharged packs have their voltage checked - if it's less than 3.8v/cell it goes on the charger for a wee tickle uo to 3.85v/cell -otherwise it goes into one of the Discharged Lipo sacks. The still charged packs stay in one of the Charged Lipo Sacks. They all live in a metal cabinet.

Just lately I've installed a whiteboard above the cabinet, which lists all the main packs in use and has a tally of the currently charged packs - that helps me decide which models to take to the field. The system is working really well at the moment.

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I charge before I go flying and pop the charged batteries in a fire-resistant carry bag.  At the field I use the batteries from the bag, and simply leave them on the ground next to my flight box after having been flown and removed from the model.  So anything in the bag is charged, and anything out of the bag is not.  No need for any other recording system.  At the end of the day all batteries go back in the bag for transport, whether they were used or not.  My charger then tells me which ones need discharging down to storage level.

 

I do have in my flight box a cheap cell checker in case a second opinion is needed.

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30 minutes ago, DaveyP said:

All of my batteries are at storage charge until the day I want to use them.

I then,  when back from the field, put them back to storage charge again.

 

Wow. You are more disciplined than me!

 

The ones I use regularly (3S 2200, 3S 1300/1500) tend to be charged most of the time as they get used at least weekly on average. Those used less, are kept at storage charge - now including those for my indoor models.....

 

Charged batteries get taken to the field in a fire-safe bag with a green cable tie on the handle. Discharged go in a fire-safe bag with a red cable-tie on the handle. 

 

I take at least a dozen packs to the field/hall and only ever charge at home.

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My word, some people really do like to over complicate things. 

 

All my batteries live in a case, they get charged when I know I'm going flying. At the field I check each one before it goes in a model using a battery doctor. Back home they all get run through a storage cycle on my charger. 

 

Minimal steps in the process. Simple. Easy. Fool proof. 

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11 minutes ago, Lima Hotel Foxtrot said:

My word, some people really do like to over complicate things. 

 

All my batteries live in a case, they get charged when I know I'm going flying. At the field I check each one before it goes in a model using a battery doctor. Back home they all get run through a storage cycle on my charger. 

 

Minimal steps in the process. Simple. Easy. Fool proof. 

As you also do, go methanol or petrol, problem solved,,,?,

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39 minutes ago, GrumpyGnome said:

Yes, then just need to charge the ignition packs, the flight packs, the starter pack, the glow start... ?

 

...and clean down your models afterwards each time... ?

Edited by MattyB
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Naughty naughty ...

 

I have never heard of a glow motor or diesel motor setting fire to an sssi area after crashing.....yet.

 

I have, on occasion, seen a Cox 049 on fire, but a good " blow" put that problem out, thankfully.

 

The engines didn't have silencers fitted, were a little reluctant to start and had just been primed via the exhaust ports. They didn't have spring starters fitted.

 

Lipo's have thier place. They are "clean" , models not needing fuel proofing, and can be flown from flat fields.

 

Just be really carefull and disciplined as they can if mistreated, be quite dangerous.

 

Am I a fan of lipo's ? No, not really...not yet, but I do like flying the lipo helo and basic drone.

 

A lipo powered basic glider will be next after weight comparison against a small diesel powered ( ci, IC ) version.

 

Electric motor, esc and battery versus small diesel engine and tank, servo and battery etc..

 

Electric is gunna win due to convinence, fuel proofing, and the system ability to "restart" in flight, to regain hieght, longer stick time.

 

All the electric propulsion part will be new to me.

 

Hopefully after Easter I will get the "green light" so I can finally "crack on".

 

No green light, time to sell up, roll over and........

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18 minutes ago, Rich Griff said:

Naughty naughty ...

 

I have never heard of a glow motor or diesel motor setting fire to an sssi area after crashing.....yet.

 

I have, on occasion, seen a Cox 049 on fire, but a good " blow" put that problem out, thankfully.

 

The engines didn't have silencers fitted, were a little reluctant to start and had just been primed via the exhaust ports. They didn't have spring starters fitted.

 

Lipo's have thier place. They are "clean" , models not needing fuel proofing, and can be flown from flat fields.

 

Just be really carefull and disciplined as they can if mistreated, be quite dangerous.

 

Am I a fan of lipo's ? No, not really...not yet, but I do like flying the lipo helo and basic drone.

 

A lipo powered basic glider will be next after weight comparison against a small diesel powered ( ci, IC ) version.

 

Electric motor, esc and battery versus small diesel engine and tank, servo and battery etc..

 

Electric is gunna win due to convinence, fuel proofing, and the system ability to "restart" in flight, to regain hieght, longer stick time.

 

All the electric propulsion part will be new to me.

 

Hopefully after Easter I will get the "green light" so I can finally "crack on".

 

No green light, time to sell up, roll over and........

 

And Gas Turbine powered models?

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The OP has passed on a tip that he thinks may be useful, other have added their way of dealing with the same possible problem. Do we need this tedious garbage of ic comparisons & uninformed nonsense regarding fires ?  

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Are you trying to encourage any casual readers of this open forum who have no other knowledge of model flying that our models are potential incendiary devices liable to burst into flames at any time ? 

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15 hours ago, PatMc said:

Do we need this tedious garbage of ic comparisons & uninformed nonsense regarding fires ?  

This topic is of interest to me as I am all electric and this is a topic about keeping track of lipo charged state that's what I expect the posts to be about. Unfortunately in life and inevitably on here there are some who take over a conversation, or topic on here, and take it in a direction that is of interest to them. Here there are exclusive IC modelers who comment on electric topics just to make a point regarding the sound of IC engines. Then once mentioned more IC electric comparisons are made with the addition of fire risks culminating in the admission that they know nothing about electric. To me this becomes as tedious as TX brand bashing and foam bashing. Does it matter is the question I think it does because the forum is a source of expertise and this sort of 'uninformed nonsense' reduces the quality of the content to the detriment of us all.

 

Steve

 

 

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